Saturday, 21 June 2014

DYI Old Truck


A DYI Pick-up Truck
As a child I have fond memories of going with my grandfather for early Saturday mornings car rides. 
Engine of the DYI Truck

Now as grandparents we take our grandchildren for similar drives, staycations, where we explore the communities we live  in looking for new, interesting things to see and do.

Pop bottle used in the engine of the old truck
 It was on one such staycation we came across this mazing Old DYI pick-up truck.

 Shane Yellow  singing Pickup Truck
Old truck engine
 Interior of the DYI Truck
Pop bottle opener on outside of DYI TruckDYI Truck
Enjoy
Grandma Snyder

©2013-2015 twosnydergirls










Wednesday, 18 June 2014

Rollkuchen

Rollkuchen Gluten Free

Rollkuchen and Watermelon

My Grandparents home had a porch that ran around two sides of the home.  You entered the kitchen the hub of the home from the porch and on hot summer days you sat on the front porch and enjoyed watermelon and rollkuchen while overlooking the garden.

Rollkuchen is a salty fried pastry that is traditionally eaten with watermelon and is part of the Russian Mennonite traditions.

At the Mennonite Relief Sale this year we ordered rollkuchen and I was flooded with memories of summer meals at Grandpa’s house that ended with Rollkuchen and watermelon.
Rollkuchen being made at Relief Sale
Rollkuchen being made at the Relief Sale


Traditions are important in families and this was a memory I could bring forward.At our traditional Father’s Day BBQ this year I made rollkuchen, gluten free rollkuchen and it was an immediate hit with everyone.  

Cast Iron Cook Pot on BBQ

You know a tradition will continue when the men talk about making it on their hiking trips and everyone engages in a discussion on how else it could be used.

Rollkuchen
1 cup sour cream (lactose free)
1 cup Almond milk
5 eggs
5 cups of gluten-free flour
3 teaspoons of xanthan gum
3 teaspoons baking powder
2 teaspoons salt

Beat together all the liquids.

Mix all dry ingredients together.

Add dry ingredients to the wet until a stiff dough forms.  Place the dough in the refrigerator for at least two hour, this step is very important.

Heat your oil in a fire proof pot, we used a cast iron pot and heated the oil outside on the BBQ side burner.
 
Divide off a quarter of your dough returning the rest to the refrigerator. Roll out the dough to a ¼ inch thicken and cut into squares or triangles (at the Relief Sale the cut and twisted the dough).  Once your oil is hot carefully place the uncooked dough in and turn to brown the dough equally on both side. 
Frying Rollkuchen

You can serve the rollkuchen as is or for a sweeter version dip the hot rollkuchen in icing sugar.

Rollkuchen dusted with Icing sugar



 Grandma Snyder
©2013-2014 twosnydergirls

Sunday, 15 June 2014

A Child's Sense of Belonging

Abstract drawing of a child being held

Owen entered the sanctuary and looked around hesitantly until he found his grandparents and he smiled as he noticed the empty chair beside his grandfather.

I wondered what his smile signified, happiness knowing his grandfather saved him a seat and/or joy at knowing he belonged to this man.

Quickly he moved down the aisle trying not to step on feet in his excitement to seek out the chair reserved just for him.

I watched as the adults he moved around and in front of reached out hands of support steadying him as he moved awkwardly along the narrow aisle.

He reached his destination and sat down, immediately his grandmother reached out to shake his hand and his grandfather followed.  I smiled as Owen and his grandfather ended their shake with the knuckle bump I so often see teenagers use when they greet one another.

I smiled inwardly and said a prayer of Thanksgiving for our church community, Owen and his grandparents.  For in this brief tableau Owen grew a little stronger in the knowledge that he belonged both to his grandparents and to his church community.

Owen like most children his age is growing up in a world that is smaller because of the internet and social media.  A world where he will be able to make friends with other children his age all around the world and communicate with them in real time.  He will understand the world in a way that no generation before him has.  And many of his friends will never be known to him except through the internet.

I believe that all children need a counterbalance to these important internet relationships,they need an equally strong sense of belonging to a local community and family where there are hands to steady, a saved seat acknowledging their importance and  knuckle bump handshakes. 

As a grandparent in the age of the internet my job is not to create internet fear in my grandchildren.  It is to be that counterbalance made up of handshakes, letters sent through ground mail, phone calls, hugs, the cheering section at soccer games and a proud blogging grandma, trustworthy relationships in good times and in bad.

Grandma Snyder
©2013-2015 twosnydergirls

Making a Sweetgrass Basket

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